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PARTNERSHIP EVENTS

CHE Partnership call: Aamjiwnaang: A Culture in Shock with Ron Plain
Wed, July 30
Hosted by the CHE Alaska Working Group

Update: CHE does not host calls in August. We will resume calls in September. Watch this box and your email for updates.

CHE Partnership call: PCBs in Schools -- Still a Problem?
Tues, Sept 9

7/10/14: MP3 recording available: Breathing Deep: Air Pollution, Health, and Public Health Policy

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Prenatal Exposure to EDCs and Obesity: Combining Toxicology and Epidemiology with Dr. Juliette Legler

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Fukushima: A View from the Ocean with Kevin Buesseler

6/17/14: MP3 recording available: Nutrition and Toxicants in Autoimmune Disease: Implications for Prevention and Treatment

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CHE Partners on why they value our work

Science and Civility
See our Mission statement.


 
WHAT'S NEW

CHE quarterly Top 10 list available

7/1/14: Each quarter CHE selects 10 topics from hundreds of news articles, research articles, publications, announcements and events in environmental health that are most noteworthy from that quarter. The 2014 2nd quarter Top 10 list is now available on CHE's blog. We invite reader comments and discussion. Additionally, you can now easily see past Top 10 lists by visiting the Top 10 webpage.

Diabetes, obesity, and chemicals - new resource

6/12/14: Sarah Howard, Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group has created a new resource using PubMed collections. She has included all the studies she has found that link environmental chemicals (and some other environmental factors) to diabetes and/or obesity, sorted by topic. You can view the studies in PubMed, or download them directly to your references database on your computer.
Read more

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
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EHN News
30 Jul Maine parents, physicians press for disclosure of phthalates use in products. Mothers, physicians and business owners were among those who called on the Maine officials Tuesday to monitor the use of potentially harmful chemicals called phthalates in children?s lunch boxes, toys, raincoats and other plastic products. Augusta Kennebec Journal.

30 Jul Leaping out of the lakes: Invasive mussels spread across America. The last line of defense today against the next zebra mussel invasion of the Great Lakes is a rule that requires overseas freighters to flush their ballast tanks with mid-ocean saltwater before the ships nose into the first navigation lock on the St. Lawrence Seaway. (Part 4 of 4) Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

30 Jul Government fails to vet chemical plants with terror risk. The government has failed to inspect virtually all of the chemical facilities that it considers to be at a higher risk for a terror attack and has underestimated the threat to densely populated cities, congressional investigators say. Associated Press.

30 Jul The reindeer herders who are battling an iron ore mine. A British company has been carrying out test drilling for iron ore in an area of Scandinavia where the Sami, Europe's only indigenous people, have lived for thousands of years. Sami reindeer herders say the proposed iron ore mine could destroy their livelihood. BBC.

30 Jul Greener film shoots can also save costs, report says. Film sets are notoriously wasteful places. Big movies can generate 225 tons of scrap metal, nearly 50 tons of construction and set debris, and 72 tons of food waste. But Hollywood crews are starting to change their ways - and the results could have surprising effects on their bottom lines. Los Angeles Times.

30 Jul Report: World faces 'insurmountable' water crises by 2040. The world will face "insurmountable" water crises in less than three decades, researchers said Tuesday, if it does not move away from water-intensive power production. Al Jazeera America.

30 Jul Forensics for the farm keep food safe. The same technology used at crime scenes to link a stray hair to a suspect can also find antibiotics or other medications in milk and meat. And the use of sophisticated testing is becoming increasingly available for livestock producers, who stand to lose lots of money if their products are tainted. Iowa Public Radio.

30 Jul 'Indiscriminate' use of antibiotics in poultry might be linked to growing resistance in Indians. Claiming that it found antibiotic residues in chickens tested in Delhi, an environment body on Wednesday said use of antibiotics in poultry industry might be "strongly linked" to growing antibiotic resistance in Indians. Times of India.

30 Jul US GMO crop companies double down on anti-labeling efforts. One year after the launch of a social media effort to allay consumers' concerns about the safety of foods made from genetically modified crops, U.S. companies that develop GMOs have further committed to a multimillion-dollar campaign to defeat attempts to add GMO labels to such foods. Reuters.

30 Jul Senate Dems? bill would bring back Superfund tax. Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and two of his colleagues introduced a bill Tuesday to reinstate the Superfund tax, which charges certain industries fees to clean up contaminated industrial sites. The Hill.

 

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