Log in - Help - October 31, 2014
CHE logo The Collaborative on Health and the Environment
This site WWW

Science and Civility
See our Mission statement.


 
WHAT'S NEW
 
 

BPA, hand sanitizer, and thermal paper receipts

10/24/14: A new study in PLOS One, authored by endocrinologist Frederick vom Saal, reports that touching thermal paper after using hand sanitizer can increase the amount of BPA absorbed by the skin 100-fold. Dr. vom Saal spoke on NPR's Science Friday about the paper. He will also speak on a CHE call on November 19, 2014 (details available soon).

CHE launches new listserv on healthy aging and the environment

10/20/14: CHE invites all Partners to sign up for the new Healthy Aging and the Environment listserv. This listserv combines the former Neurodegenerative Diseases and the Environment listserv with CHE's Healthy Aging Initiative work to create one listserv focused on emerging research and relevant articles on environmental contributors to neurological challenges and other disease endpoints in the later stages of life. To see a full list of CHE's current listservs and working groups, please visit our Initiatives page. To join the Healthy Aging and the Environment listserv, please email your request to join to info@healthandenvironment.org. You must be a CHE Partner to join a working group or listserv. You can join CHE here.

CHE's new quarterly Top 10 environmental health stories now available

10/2/14: CHE offers this selection of research, news and announcements that were of special significance during the first quarter of 2014. Items include research that made a noteworthy contribution to the field, news and announcements that took a conversation to a new level and/or new audience and some welcome action. Visit the CHE blog to see this quarter's list. We invite comment and feedback.

Biomonitoring and environmental exposures

9/8/14: Sharyle Patton, CHE Director of Special Projects and Director of the Commonweal Biomonitoring Resource Center, contributed to this new paper: Reporting individual results for biomonitoring and environmental exposures: lessons learned from environmental communication case studies. From the conclusion: "Researchers and IRBs have often speculated that reporting to people on their own chemical exposures might be harmful, because results could generate excessive worry when the health effects and remedies are unclear. However, study participants generally want their results, and studies that have reported individual results along with comparative benchmarks and interpretive context find that participants benefited by learning a great deal about environmental health."

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
Visit the CHE blog Visit CHE's Facebook page
 
EHN News
30 Oct Good for the gander? As Alaska warms, a goose forgoes a 3,300-mile migration. Right now virtually the entire population  ? about 160,000 birds ? is gathered in the sheltered and remote wetlands within the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, feasting on the most extensive beds of eelgrass on Earth. In the past, the Izembek was just a stopover in the brant's autumn journey down North America's western coastline. But nature doesn't follow that predictable course anymore. Environmental Health News.

30 Oct Toxic chemicals, carcinogens skyrocket near fracking sites. Oil and gas wells across the U.S. are spewing "dangerous" cancer-causing chemicals into the air, according to a new study that further corroborates reports of health problems around hydraulic fracturing sites. US News & World Report.

30 Oct Pennsylvania congressman launches frack waste investigation as concern rises. In a reflection of growing national concern about the disposal of oil and gas waste, a Pennsylvania congressman launched an investigation Wednesday into the way his state regulates the discarding of the unwanted, often toxic material. InsideClimate News.

30 Oct Asbestos legacy: The families fighting for compensation. Thousands of families across the U.K. are still being diagnosed with asbestos-related illnesses every year. For many of them, it is just the beginning of a long fight for compensation. BBC.

30 Oct How to be eco-friendly when you're dead. Standard burial and cremation take tons of energy and resources. So what's the most environmentally sound way to deal with a dead person? The Atlantic.

30 Oct Are money and power changing the environmental movement? Not only are environmental groups spending record amounts of cash on the races, they are also trumpeting a common vision with what advocates call an unprecedented level of coordination. And they vow it will last through future elections. Greenwire.

30 Oct Ship runs aground near Stockholm, spilling oil among pristine islands. A ship carrying 52 tons of oil in the Baltic Sea ran aground off Stockholm?s sprawling archipelago Wednesday morning and began leaking its cargo into the intricate network of islands and inlets, an online news agency reported. Los Angeles Times.

30 Oct Scientists implicate more than 100 genes in causing autism. On Tuesday, researchers at more than 50 laboratories said they had identified more than 100 genes that are mutated in children with autism, dozens more than were known before. National Public Radio.

30 Oct As infrastructure crumbles, trillions of gallons of water lost. Imagine Manhattan under almost 300 feet of water ? 2.1 trillion gallons of it. That's the amount of water that researchers estimate is lost each year in this country because of aging and leaky pipes, broken water mains and faulty meters. All Things Considered.

30 Oct 'Pervasive' amounts of radioactive material found in LA, Long Beach harbors. Scientists studying kelp beds along the coast of Southern California have detected "pervasive" amounts of a radioactive isotope known as Iodine-131 in the waters off the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Los Angeles KPCC Radio.

 

The Collaborative on Health and the Environment
c/o Commonweal, PO Box 316, Bolinas, CA 94924
For questions or comments about the website, email: info@healthandenvironment.org