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PARTNERSHIP EVENTS

CHE Partnership call: Maternal Bisphenol A Programs Offspring Metabolic Syndrome
Wed, Sept 17


CHE Partnership call: Climate Change and Health - What's New and What To Do?
Thurs, Sept 18

CHE Partnership call: Prenatal Exposures: What Do Providers Know?
Tues, Sept 30
Hosted by the CHE Fertility and Reproducitve Health Working Group


CHE Partnership call: NIEHS and Environmental Health Disparities in Alaska
Wed, Oct 1
Hosted by the CHE Alaska Working Group

9/9/14: MP3 recording available: PCBs in Schools - Still a Problem?

7/10/14: MP3 recording available: Breathing Deep: Air Pollution, Health, and Public Health Policy

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Prenatal Exposure to EDCs and Obesity: Combining Toxicology and Epidemiology with Dr. Juliette Legler

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CHE Partners on why they value our work

Science and Civility
See our Mission statement.


 
WHAT'S NEW

CHE announces new newsfeed: Your Health

9/15/14: CHE’s core mission is to bring attention to emerging science that is relevant to environmental impacts on human health and that of other species. In addition to this primary service, we have decided to occasionally post  “Your Health” selections (also referred to as “News You Can Use”) which you may find are directly useful to your health or the health of others you care about.
See the archive or subscribe to this news feed

WHO Health and Climate Summit

9/10/14: High level researchers, health ministers and intergovernmental congratulated the WHO on their vision and leadership in convening the first ever Health and Climate Summit in Geneva from August 27-29th, an historic event which brought together over 300 policy makers, health professionals, academics, and civil society representatives from around the world. 

Biomonitoring and environmental exposures

9/8/14: Sharyle Patton, CHE Director of Special Projects and Director of the Commonweal Biomonitoring Resource Center, contributed to this new paper: Reporting individual results for biomonitoring and environmental exposures: lessons learned from environmental communication case studies. From the conclusion: "Researchers and IRBs have often speculated that reporting to people on their own chemical exposures might be harmful, because results could generate excessive worry when the health effects and remedies are unclear. However, study participants generally want their results, and studies that have reported individual results along with comparative benchmarks and interpretive context find that participants benefited by learning a great deal about environmental health."

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
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EHN News
16 Sep Poultry firms systematically feed low-dose antibiotics to flocks. Major U.S. poultry firms are administering antibiotics to their flocks far more pervasively than regulators realize, posing a potential risk to human health. Reuters.

16 Sep Severe black lung returns to 1970s levels. Coal miners in Kentucky and other parts of Appalachia are contracting serious cases of black lung disease at rates not seen since the early 1970s ? just after preventive regulations were enacted, according to a study published Monday. Louisville Courier-Journal.

16 Sep Well leaks, not fracking, are linked to fouled water. A study of tainted drinking water in areas where natural gas is produced from shale shows that the contamination is most likely caused by leaky wells rather than the process of hydraulic fracturing used to release the gas from the rock. New York Times.

16 Sep Taking a health hazard home. A new study of a small group of workers at industrial hog farms in North Carolina has found that they continued to carry antibiotic-resistant bacteria over several days, raising new questions for public health officials struggling to contain the spread of such pathogens. New York Times.

16 Sep DuPont to pay $1.85 million fine after herbicide injures trees. DuPont will pay a $1.85 million penalty to resolve allegations that the global chemical company did not properly disclose the risks of using one of its herbicides, leading to widespread damage to tree species through several U.S. states. Reuters.

16 Sep Black Lung disease makes comeback, study shows. The prevalence of severe black lung disease among coal miners in Central Appalachia has hit levels not seen since coal dust was first regulated in mines about 40 years ago, according to federal researchers. Wall Street Journal.

16 Sep Cleaning up with rent-a-chemical. Lease programs are emerging as a safer, more environmentally friendly way to manage chemicals. Ensia.

16 Sep 'Water lady' on front lines in campaign against arsenic in Georgia wells. Starting in 2008, Janet McMahan had skin cancers erupting all over her body, including parts ?where the sun don?t shine.? Her two dogs had also developed cancer. She told her husband, Dr. Howard McMahan, an Ocilla family physician, ?I know what is wrong with me.? The water. Rome News-Tribune.

16 Sep Australia unveils its plan to protect Great Barrier Reef. In a bid to keep the Great Barrier Reef from being reclassified by the UN as "in danger," the Australian government on Monday unveiled a 35-year plan to manage risks to the reef, one of the natural wonders of the world. But conservationists warned that the plan did not go far enough. New York Times.

16 Sep Plastic pollution choking Australian waters: Study. Three-quarters of the trash found off Australian beaches is plastic, a study released Monday said as it warned that the rubbish is entangling and being swallowed by wildlife. Agence France-Presse.

 

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