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WHAT'S NEW

CHE quarterly Top 10 list available

7/1/14: Each quarter CHE selects 10 topics from hundreds of news articles, research articles, publications, announcements and events in environmental health that are most noteworthy from that quarter. The 2014 2nd quarter Top 10 list is now available on CHE's blog. We invite reader comments and discussion. Additionally, you can now easily see past Top 10 lists by visiting the Top 10 webpage.

Diabetes, obesity, and chemicals - new resource

6/12/14: Sarah Howard, Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group has created a new resource using PubMed collections. She has included all the studies she has found that link environmental chemicals (and some other environmental factors) to diabetes and/or obesity, sorted by topic. You can view the studies in PubMed, or download them directly to your references database on your computer.
Read more

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
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EHN News
1 Sep Desperately dry California tries to curb private drilling for water. For a century, California farmers believed that the law put control of groundwater in the hands of landowners, who could drill as many wells as deeply as they wanted, and court challenges were few. That just changed. New York Times.

1 Sep Large ?dead zone? signals more problems for Chesapeake Bay. It began forming in May, when heavy spring rains loaded the rivers and creeks with fertilizer washed from farms and suburban lawns. It grew rapidly over the summer, as a broth of chemicals, animal waste and microbes simmered in the warm, slow-moving waters of the Chesapeake Bay. By early August, the ?dead zone? was back. Washington Post.

1 Sep Dubbed terrorists, Mayans fight back against Guatemalan mining projects. Community leaders in the Mayan Mam village of Agel say that the Marlin mine has contaminated the water sources that they use to wash and irrigate their crops and that the subterranean explosions have caused houses to collapse ? charges that the mine?s owners deny. Newsweek.

1 Sep Food security faces growing pest advance. Coming soon to a farm near you: just about every possible type of pest that could take advantage of the ripening harvest in the nearby fields. Wherever they can make a living, they will. This does not bode well for food security in a world of nine billion people and increasingly rapid climate change. Climate News Network.

1 Sep California drought: Why doesn't California build big dams any more? Why did the era of big dams end, when California has built new roads, schools, universities, hospitals and freeways? Experts say there are a confluence of factors, from environmental laws to funding to a lack of suitable sites. Now supporters of new reservoirs are trying to start a new dam-building era. San Jose Mercury News.

1 Sep Dumpster dining: Environmentalist raises awareness about food waste. Rob Greenfield spent the morning shopping for food, but not in the supermarket. Greenfield is an environmental activist who is traveling part of the country to shop in Dumpsters behind grocery stores, drugstores and other places to draw attention to the amount of food wasted every day in America. Detroit Free Press.

1 Sep Puget Sound's endangered killer whales continue decline. With two deaths this year and no new calves since 2012, the population of endangered killer whales in the Puget Sound continues to decline. The number of whales has dropped to 78, a figure not seen since 1985. Associated Press.

1 Sep Bacteria offers bowel cancer clue. Bacteria in the gut could hold the key to a new way of tackling bowel cancer, research suggests. Scientists have discovered a powerful link between high fat diets, intestinal bacteria, and the disease. Belfast Telegraph.

1 Sep The secret to happiness can be found by digging in the dirt. By now, many of us are familiar with the ?hygiene hypothesis? ? the idea that an environment that?s too clean may actually increase our risk of disease. This hypothesis usually gets discussed in terms of ailments like allergies or autoimmune disorders, but some research shows that dirt might be good for our mental health, too. New York Times.

1 Sep How to buy a mine in Wisconsin. Last year, Gov. Scott Walker and the Republican-controlled State Legislature approved the world?s largest open-pit iron ore mine in northern Wisconsin. The mine legislation was bad enough from an environmental point of view. It turns out to be even more shocking from an ethical viewpoint. New York Times.

 

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