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CHE's Quarterly Top 10 List Available

10/7/15: We present the ten most significant news or research stories in environmental health of the last quarter, in CHE’s view. The first three items are statements from major scientific or health organizations summarizing large bodies of research and drawing conclusions about the interaction of our environments and our health. 

Additional items in this list present notable new research, new policy developments, new focus or new thinking on their respective topics.

World Environmental Health Day
September 26, 2015

To commemorate World Environmental Health Day this year and its focus on children’s environment and health, CHE is publishing a series of short essays from partners who are leaders in children’s environmental health:

Dr. Landrigan spoke on a CHE Partnership call: One Pediatrician’s Journey Pioneering the Field of Children’s Environmental Health on Tuesday September 29th. The MP3 recording is now available.

Also in celebration of World Environmental Health Day, CHE has collected photos of children who are extra special to us and who help drive our commitment to our work. See the photo collection, and enjoy the smiling faces of the future.

Special offer for CHE Partners: CHE Partners can now purchase the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Toms River, from Island Press at a 20% discount

7/13/15: The true story of a small town ravaged by industrial pollution, Toms River won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize and has been hailed by The New York Times as "a new classic of science reporting." Now available in paperback with a new afterword by acclaimed author Dan Fagin, the book masterfully blends hard-hitting investigative journalism, scientific discovery, and unforgettable characters. Enter code 4CHE when ordering.

A Story of Health

New multimedia eBook
receives high praise

4/23/15: Your health. The environment. What’s the story? CHE and partners have created A Story of Health multimedia eBook to investigate just that. How do different aspects of our environment interact with our genes to influence our health across the lifespan? Through the lives of fictional characters, the first three stories explore multiple factors that can contribute to childhood leukemia, asthma, and learning and developmental disabilities. You can download the entire book or individual chapters featuring research about disease origin and helpful facts about disease prevention. Stories on additional health endpoints are forthcoming. 

The eBook is usable by parents and individuals who have no formal training in science or medicine, but it also has layers of additional information and materials for physicians, nurses, and other clinicians who want to dig deeper. In fact, free continuing education credits are available for health professionals from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

A Story of Health has received high praise from health leaders across the country. For example, Brian Linde, MD, Pediatric Hospitalist at Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, California, said, “This is a fantastic resource. It is compelling, educational, and engaging, and will absolutely make a difference.” Lawrence Rosen, MD, Founder of The Whole Child Center, added, “A Story of Health is the most engaging and compelling environmental health resource I’ve experienced. I recommend it for all who care our planet and the impact we have on its health—and vice versa.” Read more testimonials about the value of A Story of Health.

If you have not yet taken a look at A Story of Health we encourage you to do so now. Read it with your family, and share it with your friends and colleagues. It’s free, it’s easy to use, and it draws from the latest research available. You can also listen to the CHE Partnership calls featuring Stephen's story/childhood leukemia and Brett's story/asthma.

A Story of Health was developed by ATSDR, the Collaborative on Health and the Environment (CHE), the University of California, San Francisco, Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (UCSF PEHSU), the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California EPA (OEHHA), and the Science and Environmental Health Network (SEHN).

San Francisco Medical Society journal focuses on environmental health

11/10/14: San Francisco Medicine (SFM), which has been in continuous publication since 1927, is the official journal of the San Francisco Medical Society. Each issue of SFM focuses on a specific topic that affects physicians and their practices, including public health, social, political, economic, and lifestyle issues.The most recent edition of the journal focuses on environmental health and features an article titled The First 1000 Days: A Healthy Return on Investment co-authored by Elise Miller, MEd, CHE's Director, and Ted Schettler, MD, MPH, Science Director at SEHN and at CHE, as well as many other articles that will be of interest to CHE Partners. Visit the San Francisco Medical's Society website to read the full edition.


CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

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EHN News
8 Oct Your organic cotton tee-shirt probably poisoned a river in India. Bet you a tidy sum that the label boasting of organic fiber on that shirt says nothing about the luscious color. And for good reason. We tend to be blissfully unaware of the myriad health problems attributed to the textile dyeing process. Seattle Globalist.

8 Oct Can the cheetah outrun extinction? Habitat loss. Conflict with humans. Climate change. Limited genetic diversity. The illegal wildlife trade. The list of threats Africa?s cheetahs face just seems to go on and on. Scientific American.

8 Oct Before California's drought, a century of disparity. In the San Joaquin Valley, a legacy of shortsighted land-use planning has intensified the water crisis for poor residents. CityLab.

8 Oct Ozone, mercury, ash, CO2: Regulations take on coal?s dirty underside. The industry complains about the constant stream of regulations, but others say the Obama administration?s focus on public health is long overdue. InsideClimate News.

8 Oct India?s energy crisis. Can India modernize its manufacturing economy and supply electricity to its growing population without relying heavily on coal?and quite possibly destroying the global climate? MIT Technology Review.

8 Oct Woman awarded $1.6M for DuPont's pollution. An Ohio woman was awarded $1.6 million Wednesday in the trial of a lawsuit that alleged a chemical from a DuPont Co. plant contaminated drinking water and contributed to her contracting kidney cancer. Associated Press.

8 Oct Epigenetic 'tags' linked to homosexuality in men. For the first time, researchers have found associations between homosexuality and markers attached to DNA that can be influenced by environmental factors. Nature.

8 Oct Store-receipt chemicals taint blood and urine. Handling cash-register receipts may cost extra ? at least in terms of health risks, a new study suggests. Science News for Students.

8 Oct Flint officials are no longer saying the water is fine. The soothing talk about the safety of city water has vanished. In recent weeks, testing has shown increased levels of lead in the blood of some Flint children ? and health officials pointed to the water as a possible source. New York Times.

8 Oct Who dies and who survives during a mass extinction? A tantalizing clue. Scientists reconstructed the largest mass extinction in Earth's history in search of clues about why species survive. Washington Post.


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