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PARTNERSHIP EVENTS

Update: CHE does not host calls in August. We will resume calls in September. Watch this box and your email for updates.

CHE Partnership call: PCBs in Schools -- Still a Problem?
Tues, Sept 9

7/30/14: MP3 recording available: Aamjiwnaang: A Culture in Shock with Ron Plain

7/10/14: MP3 recording available: Breathing Deep: Air Pollution, Health, and Public Health Policy

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Prenatal Exposure to EDCs and Obesity: Combining Toxicology and Epidemiology with Dr. Juliette Legler

6/18/14: MP3 recording available: Fukushima: A View from the Ocean with Kevin Buesseler

6/17/14: MP3 recording available: Nutrition and Toxicants in Autoimmune Disease: Implications for Prevention and Treatment

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CHE Partners on why they value our work

Science and Civility
See our Mission statement.


 
WHAT'S NEW

CHE quarterly Top 10 list available

7/1/14: Each quarter CHE selects 10 topics from hundreds of news articles, research articles, publications, announcements and events in environmental health that are most noteworthy from that quarter. The 2014 2nd quarter Top 10 list is now available on CHE's blog. We invite reader comments and discussion. Additionally, you can now easily see past Top 10 lists by visiting the Top 10 webpage.

Diabetes, obesity, and chemicals - new resource

6/12/14: Sarah Howard, Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group has created a new resource using PubMed collections. She has included all the studies she has found that link environmental chemicals (and some other environmental factors) to diabetes and/or obesity, sorted by topic. You can view the studies in PubMed, or download them directly to your references database on your computer.
Read more

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
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EHN News
31 Jul In West Virginia, whitewater rafting and the long tail of a chemical spill. Not a trace of MCHM flowed into the New or Gauley rivers, which sit well upstream of the site where 10,000 gallons of the chemical used in the mining industry poured into the Elk River in Charleston in January. But rafting outfitters here believe the nearby chemical leak tainted business. Washington Post.

31 Jul Study says early DDT exposure may set up females for obesity, diabetes. As they reached adulthood, female mice who were exposed in utero and just after birth to the pesticide DDT showed metabolic changes that put them at greater risk for obesity and type-2 diabetes, a new study says. Los Angeles Times.

31 Jul Dam removals: Rivers on the run. As the U.S. destroys its old dams, preliminary data suggests species are streaming back into the unfettered rivers. Nature.

31 Jul Century-old pipe break points to national problem. The rupture of a nearly century-old water main that ripped a 15-foot hole through Sunset Boulevard and turned a swath of the University of California, Los Angeles, into a mucky mess points to the risks and expense many cities face with miles of water lines installed generations ago. Associated Press.

31 Jul US Dept. of Energy proposes leaving Hanford radioactive groundwater contamination to dissipate. The Department of Energy proposes to leave some groundwater contamination near the Columbia River to dissipate over 35 to 150 years. That's not sitting well with some agencies and community organizations. Kennewick Tri-City Herald.

31 Jul Environmentalists criticize Massachusetts mercury recycling bill. Recycling mercury from old thermostats and light bulbs is mandated under a bill being weighed by Gov. Deval Patrick, but environmentalists say the legislation doesn?t do enough to protect waterways. Salem News.

31 Jul In Lake of the Woods, growing algae blooms puzzle scientists. Residents have noticed that algae blooms in Minnesota's northern lakes appear to be expanding. Scientists don't yet know exactly how much blooms have expanded, but early findings suggest the algae is getting thicker, likely due to a combination of climate change and decades-old pollution. Minnesota Public Radio.

31 Jul EPA carbon plan gives no credit for Southern states' strides, utility regulators say in Atlanta. Utility regulators in Georgia and Mississippi say their states have made steps to cut carbon emissions or shift toward cleaner, emission-free sources of fuel such as nuclear or solar. They are frustrated that this is not enough in the eyes of the EPA, which is asking states to meet strict carbon-emission targets that assume utilities will have to shutter thousands of megawatts of coal-fired power plants as well. EnergyWire.

31 Jul Religious conservatives embrace pollution fight. The Rev. Lennox Yearwood punched his fist in the air as he rhythmically boomed into the microphone: "This is a moment for great leadership. This is a moment for our country to stand up. This is our moment." But Mr. Yearwood?s audience was not a church. It was the Environmental Protection Agency. New York Times.

31 Jul Oil companies forfeit Arctic drilling rights. Oil companies that locked up more than 1.3 million acres of the Beaufort Sea for drilling in 2007 have since relinquished nearly half that territory. Houston Chronicle.

 

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