Log in - Help - August 29, 2014
CHE logo The Collaborative on Health and the Environment
This site WWW

Science and Civility
See our Mission statement.


 
WHAT'S NEW

CHE quarterly Top 10 list available

7/1/14: Each quarter CHE selects 10 topics from hundreds of news articles, research articles, publications, announcements and events in environmental health that are most noteworthy from that quarter. The 2014 2nd quarter Top 10 list is now available on CHE's blog. We invite reader comments and discussion. Additionally, you can now easily see past Top 10 lists by visiting the Top 10 webpage.

Diabetes, obesity, and chemicals - new resource

6/12/14: Sarah Howard, Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group has created a new resource using PubMed collections. She has included all the studies she has found that link environmental chemicals (and some other environmental factors) to diabetes and/or obesity, sorted by topic. You can view the studies in PubMed, or download them directly to your references database on your computer.
Read more

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
Visit the CHE blog Visit CHE's Facebook page
 
EHN News
28 Aug Heavy metal songs: Contaminated songbirds sing the wrong tunes. Scientists have long known that mercury is a potent toxicant: It disrupts the architecture of human brains, and it can change birds? behavior and kill their chicks. But after extensive research in Virginia, scientists have shown that mercury also alters the very thing that many birds are known for ? their songs. Environmental Health News.

28 Aug Fishery mislabeling could mean more mercury than buyers bargain for. That Chilean sea bass from the local grocery store could have twice the methylmercury that?s expected ? if it comes from a region other than indicated on the label, a new study says. Reuters Health.

28 Aug DuPont agrees to $1.3 million in chemical leak fines. DuPont Co. has agreed to pay nearly $1.3 million in fines to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to resolve violations the EPA cited after a string of 2010 chemical leaks, EPA officials announced Wednesday. Charleston Gazette.

28 Aug To catch a salmon. Dams aren?t the only power-generating strongholds that salmon are up against on the Columbia River: Coal trains not only threaten the salmon habitat, they threaten the economics of the fishing industry. Eugene Weekly.

28 Aug Big Food to divulge chemical info. Food companies are trying to beat the federal government?s push to make chemicals in food more transparent. Politico.

28 Aug New rhino threat: Coal. Plans for an open cast coal mine on the border of South Africa's Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park are controversial because the park is home to the largest population of white rhinos in the world and mine opponents are concerned about worsening air and water quality, and increased crime. Earth Focus.

28 Aug Gift-bearing officials try to lure Chinese factories inland. With foreign investment falling, inland provinces are in a cutthroat competition to attract domestic industries, offering significant financial incentives to businesses and even undercutting one another in crucial areas like environmental regulation. New York Times.

28 Aug Countries with the worst air pollution ranked by World Health Organization. The World Health Organization released its 2014 report into global air pollution with some concerning finds. The database looked at the air pollution levels of 1600 cities across 19 countries by using a reading called PM2.5 and PM10. News.com.au.

28 Aug Nearly half of global trash is burned, creating more pollution than reported: Study. Rampant trash-burning is throwing more pollution and toxic particles into the air than governments are reporting, according to a scientific study estimating that more than 40 percent of the world?s garbage is burned. Japan Times.

28 Aug Could climate change cause deadly epidemics? A new study found that Dengue fever, a virus spread by mosquitoes, eventually could become a significant health problem in parts of Europe, including Mediterranean and Adriatic coastal areas that are popular with tourists. Europe is becoming hotter and more humid, conditions which foster the growth of the mosquitoes. Discovery Channel.

 

The Collaborative on Health and the Environment
c/o Commonweal, PO Box 316, Bolinas, CA 94924
For questions or comments about the website, email: info@healthandenvironment.org