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WHAT'S NEW

CHE announces new newsfeed: Your Health

9/15/14: CHE’s core mission is to bring attention to emerging science that is relevant to environmental impacts on human health and that of other species. In addition to this primary service, we have decided to occasionally post  “Your Health” selections (also referred to as “News You Can Use”) which you may find are directly useful to your health or the health of others you care about.
See the archive or subscribe to this news feed

WHO Health and Climate Summit

9/10/14: High level researchers, health ministers and intergovernmental congratulated the WHO on their vision and leadership in convening the first ever Health and Climate Summit in Geneva from August 27-29th, an historic event which brought together over 300 policy makers, health professionals, academics, and civil society representatives from around the world. 

Biomonitoring and environmental exposures

9/8/14: Sharyle Patton, CHE Director of Special Projects and Director of the Commonweal Biomonitoring Resource Center, contributed to this new paper: Reporting individual results for biomonitoring and environmental exposures: lessons learned from environmental communication case studies. From the conclusion: "Researchers and IRBs have often speculated that reporting to people on their own chemical exposures might be harmful, because results could generate excessive worry when the health effects and remedies are unclear. However, study participants generally want their results, and studies that have reported individual results along with comparative benchmarks and interpretive context find that participants benefited by learning a great deal about environmental health."

CHE participates in Reach the Decision Makers Team

5/12/14: Sarah Howard (2nd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Diabetes-Obesity Spectrum Working Group, and Karin Russ (3rd from left), National Coordinator of the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group, were a part of the Reach the Decision Makers team (sponsored by UCSF's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment), that met with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to discuss how they evaluate thyroid hormone disrupting chemicals in the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program. The Reach the Decision Makers Fellowship trains scientists, community members, clinicians and public health professionals to effectively promote science and health-based policies at the US EPA.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
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EHN News
2 Oct Bad air days at Texas parks. Around North Texas parks and playgrounds, children are breathing dangerous doses of toxic fumes from gas industry sites. Fort Worth Weekly.

2 Oct Baker Hughes starts disclosing frac chemicals. Baker Hughes Inc. this month will start disclosing all of the chemicals it uses during hydraulic fracturing ? the first of the major oil field service companies to adopt a policy of transparency. San Antonio Express-News.

2 Oct Chemicals industry ramps up political spending for midterms. The American Chemistry Council has more than trippled its political spending ahead of the midterm elections as it fights tougher chemical regulations in Washington, according a new report from a watchdog group. The Hill.

2 Oct Zeroing in on a risk factor? PBDE exposure and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Although no longer manufactured here, PBDE flame retardants are still found in imported and older products; they also persist in the environment. A new study suggests that exposure to specific PBDE congeners may be a risk factor for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Environmental Health Perspectives.

2 Oct New federal rule allows freighters to dump cargo remnants into Great Lakes. Environmental groups came up short in their fight to prevent freighters from sweeping or washing limestone, iron ore, coal and other non-toxic remnants of their dry cargo into the Great Lakes. Buffalo News.

2 Oct EPA planning to issue health advisories on harmful algal blooms by May 2015. The Environmental Protection Agency is aiming to issue by May 2015 drinking water health advisories for cyanobacteria, the harmful forms of blue-green algae that contaminated water supplies in Toledo, Ohio, and resulted in a weekend-long ban in early August. Bloomberg BNA.

2 Oct Massive Mongolian mine endangers nomads? water, way of life. As the massive Oyu Tolgoi mine scales up, the operation that?s now led by mining giant Rio Tinto has struggled to live up to its promises of world-class environmental standards. The mine pledged, for example, to leave herders? scarce water sources untouched. Center for Investigative Reporting.

2 Oct Troubled waters. In 100 years, the Spokane River has transformed from sacred ground to sewage dump to the region's resilient mascot. Civilization has suffocated it. Industry has dammed it, poisoned it. Neighbors have forsaken it. Still it flows. Pacific Northwest Inlander.

2 Oct Pesticides and autism spectrum disorders. A new study reports an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder among children whose mothers lived during pregnancy near fields where pesticides were applied. Environmental Health Perspectives.

2 Oct Fire retardants wash out in laundry. Flame retardants used in furniture and electronics work their way into aquatic food chains, accumulating in organisms from mussels to fish to seals. Chemical & Engineering News.

 

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