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PARTNERSHIP EVENTS

CHE Partnership call: Only One Chance: How Contaminants in our Environment Impair Brain Development
Wed, Feb 4
Hosted by the CHE Alaska Working Group

CHE Partnership call: Placental Toxicants and Disruption to Development
Wed, Feb 25
Hosted by the CHE Fertility and Reproductive Health Working Group

CHE Partnership call: Environmental Influences on the Thyroid System
Thurs, Feb 26

CHE Partnership call: Flame Retardants and Public Health: Fire Safety Without Harm
Wed, March 4
Hosted by the CHE Alaska Working Group

1/22/15: MP3 recording available: A Story of Childhood Leukemia, A Story of Health: Genetic and Environmental Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia

1/21/15: MP3 recording available: Environmental Exposures and Immune Function with Dr. Paige Lawrence

1/8/15: MP3 recording available: The State of the Water: Linking Ocean Health to Human Health
 

12/10/14: MP3 recording available: Health Effects of Perinatal Exposures to BPA and Other Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs): State of the Science and Policy Update

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CHE Partners on why they value our work

Science and Civility
See our Mission statement.


 
WHAT'S NEW
 
 

A Story of Health

New multimedia eBook released

1/21/15: A Story of Health is a multimedia eBook explores how our environments interact with our genes to influence health across the lifespan. We tell A Story of Health through the lives of fictional characters and their families - Brett, a young boy with asthma; Amelia, a teenager with developmental disabilities; and toddler Stephen, recently diagnosed with leukemia. Each fictional case features the latest scientific research about disease origin and helpful facts about disease prevention. Colorful illustrations, graphics and videos enhance each page. Links to a wide range of additional resources and hundreds of scientific papers enrich each story with information you can use today to promote health and prevent disease.

The eBook offers FREE continuing education credits through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)/the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR).

A Story of Health was developed by ATSDR, the Collaborative on Health and the Environment (CHE), the University of California, San Francisco, Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (UCSF PEHSU), the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California EPA (OEHHA), and the Science and Environmental Health Network (SEHN).

Visit the webpage to download the eBook and learn more.

Listen to the MP3 recording from the CHE Partnership call on childhood leukemia, featuring Stephen's story from A Story of Health.

CHE quarterly Top 10 environmental health stories now available

1/13/15: CHE offers this selection of research, news and announcements that were of special significance during the fourth quarter of 2014. Items include research that made a noteworthy contribution to the field, news and announcements that took a conversation to a new level and/or new audience and some welcome action. Visit the CHE blog to see this quarter's list. We invite comment and feedback.

San Francisco Medical Society journal focuses on environmental health

11/10/14: San Francisco Medicine (SFM), which has been in continuous publication since 1927, is the official journal of the San Francisco Medical Society. Each issue of SFM focuses on a specific topic that affects physicians and their practices, including public health, social, political, economic, and lifestyle issues.The most recent edition of the journal focuses on environmental health and features an article titled The First 1000 Days: A Healthy Return on Investment co-authored by Elise Miller, MEd, CHE's Director, and Ted Schettler, MD, MPH, Science Director at SEHN and at CHE, as well as many other articles that will be of interest to CHE Partners. Visit the San Francisco Medical's Society website to read the full edition.

CHE Director interviewed on NYC-based public radio on health and the exposome

3/15/14: During this interview on WBAI-New York, Elise Miller, CHE's director, discusses how the success in mapping the human genome has fostered interest in mapping the “exposome", a term coined to describe everything a person is exposed to starting at conception and includes lifestyle choices and well as chemical exposures. Elise further explains to health journalist, Liz Seegret, how the genome and the exposome, as well as the interactions between them, affect our health across the lifespan. This interview was based on Elise's "pioneer pitch" to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation last October in New York City.
Listen to the interview

Read more about RWJF's Pioneer Pitch

Ecology of Breast Cancer

12/1/13: The Ecology of Breast Cancer: The Promise of Prevention and the Hope for Healing is a new book by Ted Schettler, MD, MPH that makes the case that breast cancer is a disease arising from diverse societal conditions. Although well-recognized risk factors and a person’s life style are important, they simply do not explain why many people develop the disease. Nor do they fully explain breast cancer patterns in populations.
Download the book (complete version or chapter-by-chapter)
Listen to the CHE call featuring Dr. Schettler
Listen to the New School conversation featuring Dr. Schettler


 
PARTNER SPOTLIGHT

CHE regularly highlights the work of our Partners here in our Partner Spotlight.

Vi Waghiyi is a St. Lawrence Island Yupik mother and grandmother, Native Village of Savoonga Tribal Member, and Environmental Health and Justice Program Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT), which is also the organizational host of CHE's Alaska Working Group. In this CHE Partner Spotlight, Vi discusses her work addressing environmental contamination and its impact on human health in Alaska.

What inspired you to begin working in the field of environmental health, and in your current work in particular?

I am a Yupik mother of four boys and a grandmother from Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, located in the northern Bering Sea. Our people have maintained a traditional culture of reliance on traditional foods from the land and sea that provide physical, cultural, and spiritual sustenance.

I learned about the high levels of PCBs in our people in a news article in the Anchorage Daily News when I was a stay-at-home mom. This touched me personally because so many family members and friends from my community, including my parents, have suffered and died of cancer. I have had three miscarriages. I am inspired by this awareness and what I have come to learn about the contamination from military and distant sources and making the connection with the illnesses suffered by my people. I was brought up in a culture of caring where people work together. We were wronged by the US military and corporations that have contaminated my people without our consent. We are the victims of environmental violence. This goes against my culture and upbringing. I am inspired to hold the military and other polluters accountable and to achieve justice. I am inspired to work for the health and well-being of my people and our future generations.

Continue reading...


Read past interviews.


 
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EHN News
1 Feb Scientists say ozone from Asia contributes to the West's pollution. Scientists at rural, high-altitude sites across the western U.S. have been documenting rising levels of ozone, which can trigger asthma attacks, worsen heart and lung disease and lead to premature deaths, even as emissions have plummeted nationwide over the last few decades. Los Angeles Times.

1 Feb Chevron to Abandon Shale Natural Gas Venture in Poland. Chevron said on Friday that it would abandon efforts to find and produce natural gas from shale rock in Poland, in perhaps the biggest setback yet to fledgling efforts to start a European shale oil and gas industry that might help replace the region?s dwindling fuel resources. New York Times.

1 Feb Dan River Coal Ash Disaster: Most ash settled up to 25 miles downstream. All this trouble stems from the powdery, drab-colored substance that remains after a power plant burns coal to produce electricity. Greensboro News & Record.

1 Feb Ganga pollution: Closure process starts for 98 tanneries. Cracking down on polluting tanneries, Uttar Pradesh Pollution Control Board today initiated the process of closing 98 such factories in Kanpur, which were allegedly releasing toxic effluents in River Ganga, by cutting electricity supply to them. New Delhi Business Standard.

1 Feb Monsanto Shareholder Meeting Gets Heated. Monsanto Co. has long been a lightning rod for debate, but at its annual shareholder meeting Friday, the biotech-seed company was tagged with blame or credit for an even larger number of issues than usual. Wall Street Journal.

1 Feb The real cost of cheap meat: Factory farms could be lowering our resistance to disease. Massive cow feedlots are releasing antibiotic-resistant superbugs into the air ? gene sequences that can travel far and wide and even weaken humans? resistance to diseases. Salon.

1 Feb EPA should strengthen the standards for clean air. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is seeking to reduce harmful smog pollution nationwide. Nowhere else is this more needed than in California, where 77 percent of the population is breathing unhealthy air, which kills 25,000 people every year. Sacramento Bee.

31 Jan Builder projects 18-month delay for nuclear plant in Georgia. Southern Co. said the firms building its new nuclear power plant in Georgia estimate the project will be delayed 18 months, potentially costing the power company $720 million in new charges, company officials said Thursday. Associated Press.

31 Jan Plastic Age: How it's reshaping rocks, oceans and life. One million years from now, geologists exploring our planet's concrete-coated crust will uncover strange signs of civilizations past. "Look at this," one will exclaim, cracking open a rock to reveal a thin black disc covered in tiny ridges. "It's a fossil from the Plasticene age." New Scientist.

31 Jan Beijing seeks to contain its population, and with it, problems. Beijing's population at the end of last year had swelled to 21.52 million - more than double the population of Los Angeles County. Nearly a third of the capital?s inhabitants are migrant workers, who come in search of better opportunity. Los Angeles Times.

 

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